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 Two-year-old Calgary boy made member of Mensa

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Just wanted to share this article about a 2 year old boy with an incredibly high IQ. It's astonishing. I can't believe he was recognizing the alphabet at 6 months of age. wow

So, do you know anyone who tested really high for IQ as a child? Did they face challenges in the regular school system? Were they "normal" socially speaking? I wonder what happens to people who are identified as being super intelligent from such a young age...

http://www.calgaryherald.com/news/calgary/year+Calgary+made+member+Mensa/6494732/story.html#yyc
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 21 Apr 2012 11:03 AM
 2 Aug 2009
Nuke
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3,348
Interesting....I guess IQ doesn't help potty training though tongueold
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 21 Apr 2012 11:05 AM
 10 Apr 2012
Ginger Kitty
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My very good friend has an extremely gifted son and it has been incredibly hard. He is in the top 1% percentile for intelligence in the World. He is currently being home schooled until he is old enough to go to school in the Stated because there is no schools in Canada that can accommodate him. He has an extremely hard time with social relationships and the psychologist said that it is likely he will never be able to have a romantic relationship.
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 21 Apr 2012 11:12 AM
 3 Jan 2009
zoobaby
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6,506
It's interesting, but I definitely think could be a double-edged sword. I think it's a LOT easier to go through life with average abilities. Bright's good, sure, but I can imagine they are going to face quite a few challenges.
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 21 Apr 2012 11:14 AM
 2 Jan 2009
 Nunavut
MillyHa
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6,666
There was a student in a school that I had taught in that was a member of Mensa. She graduated high school at 13 and graduated university at 15. While obviously very bright, she struggled socially.

While I'd like my (potential) children not to struggle academically, I don't think I'd choose super high intelligence if it were a choice because it's so often combined with the lack of social skills which can make life extremely difficult.
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 21 Apr 2012 12:19 PM
 10 Sep 2006
 Southwestern Ontario
AJsLove
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5,604
I tested at genius level when I was in elementary school (though I was never invited to join Mensa!!). Although I have a really high IQ, I'm pretty average now. The boy in the article has an IQ of less than 10 points above my own. I'm a little socially awkward, but I'm also a good enough actor for people to not know. I was super bored in elementary school even though I skipped a grade and had my own lesson plans separate from everyone else in my classes, so I never even had homework until high school. I would leave everything until the last second and still get good grades in high school. University was hard for me because I never learned good time management skills.

I do have a bit of a problem with feeling like I'm being watched or observed because I always was as a child. I didn't realize how much I was until I intercepted a letter sent to my parents in grade 7 or 8 from the school that my parents said was just a regular update on me and they got them all the time. It said that I appear to have social anxiety disorder. I don't know if I actually do, but I wonder why I might if I'm always being watched! I think reading that also made me feel like I did have social anxiety and made it worse.

Anyway, I function pretty well now and most people would never know I'm a "genius", but my parents definitely had some challenges with me. I'm sure I'm also a pretty big disappointment now because I never lived up to my potential. I have a University degree, but I don't use it and I work in retail (when I'm not on mat leave). Sorry world, I couldn't live up to your expectations!
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 21 Apr 2012 12:44 PM
 10 Sep 2006
 Southwestern Ontario
AJsLove
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5,604
Yeah my mom said she can't remember when I wasn't talking, I started talking in full sentences too. She still jokes a lot about how I used to always correct her grammar when I was 2.

Maybe it's just too early to tell with DD. I don't think she recognizes the alphabet like the boy in the article, but I've also never used flash cards with her.
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 21 Apr 2012 1:47 PM
 13 Aug 2006
 Calgary, Alberta
cherryblossom
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6,605
The whole flashcard thing makes me wonder what happens to high IQ children who have parents who DON'T use flashcards, and who may not even notice that their child is different than their peers. I guess that child's superior intelligence wouldn't be noticed until school? The boy in the article has parents who seem the type to push gifted thing a bit. I don't know a lot of parents who focused on the alphabet from such an early age. We focused on pictures of animals, etc.
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 21 Apr 2012 1:54 PM
 10 Sep 2006
 Southwestern Ontario
AJsLove
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5,604
Yeah I know what you mean. My parents could tell from my speech that I was "gifted", though I learned to talk really quickly and had speech impediments LOL. I know they weren't pushing me to do math as a toddler, they just saw things on their own and not by pushing. I'll encourage DD, but right now I just read to her and sing to her and let her play with toys, I don't expect her to be able to tell time and recite Shakespearean monologues. I worry that the boy's parents may be pushing a little too much too, which puts very high expectations on the child. Of course I don't really know that, just a possible impression from the article.

To quote Kumar: "Just cause you're hung like a moose doesn't mean you gotta do porn."

Not all geniuses need to BE geniuses.
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 21 Apr 2012 3:47 PM
 25 Oct 2007
 Alberta
samoreo
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Have [general] you read Outliers? There's a whole section on how super geniuses usually have a really difficult time and how above-average intelligence + decent social skills makes for a much more successful combination. I can't remember much more...but I do remember that I would not want an IQ in 150's!

I hope that boy isn't pushed too hard. Who would have thought to give their 6 month old flash cards? My DD was always very alert, but I never thought, "oh hey. I should totally bring out the abacus."
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 21 Apr 2012 4:14 PM
 13 Aug 2006
 Calgary, Alberta
cherryblossom
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6,605
^Yes. Loved that book! It was interesting, but aside from that book, I haven't really read much on the topic.
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 21 Apr 2012 4:26 PM
 25 Mar 2012
zolly
Rookie
56
i never had my iq tested as a kid. i'm glad. i am like AJ and skipped a grade and had special learning plans. i could read at 3, and got myself into a LOT of trouble in kindergarten/grade 1, because i was bored out of my tree. i spent a lot of time in the corner.

i remember they wanted me to skip a second grade. i would have graduated at 15. i refused...it would have put me in grade 8 at 11.

i did ok in university, but like AJ, had crappy time management skills. i also am not used to working hard at stuff...so when i have to, i feel like a failure.

my husband makes me look like a dumbarse. but i think it's because not only does he have intelligence, he has work ethic. he also has so-so social skills. mine are much better than his...but that comes from going into nursing. i've had to learn to make small talk with EVERYONE. when i was in high school, i wouldn't use a telephone. seriously. no issues at all...


my oldest daughter is showing signs of being fairly intelligent. i don't care. she's harper. end of story. i don't ever want her to be treated the way i was. i was known as the school science experiment because they didn't know what to do with me. they would put me in classrooms three grades ahead.
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 21 Apr 2012 4:28 PM
 22 Mar 2012
 Ottawa, Ontario
Jenetic
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327
You may also find that some geniuses suffer from Aspergers, to some degree. My DH's younger brother is really book smart but he has no clue with social stuff.
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 21 Apr 2012 5:06 PM
 10 Apr 2012
Ginger Kitty
New Member
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My friend has a very high paying job that she was able to take a leave of absence from in order to be able to home school. Her son is 11 and has completed the high school curriculum. He has been tested for Aspergers a few times because he seems to present with the symptoms, but he does meet the criteria. It is believed his social issues are completely due to being unable to ever relate to a similarly aged peer.
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 21 Apr 2012 7:05 PM
 22 Jun 2011
Apples
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Interesting article!! Thanks for sharing.
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 21 Apr 2012 7:10 PM
 1 Jan 2006
FeministSprig
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The new DSM proposes to take away the diagnosis of Aspergers' Syndrome.
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 21 Apr 2012 7:24 PM
 13 Jul 2006
 GVA, wishing it was GTA
tjrocks
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I was labeled as gifted as a child. My parents opted out of putting me in a dedicated enhanced learning school, which I'm not entirely sure was the right decision. While technically 'smart', I don't learn well using traditional methods, so I struggled with maths and sciences in school and was CONSTANTLY told I wasn't living up to my potential. It was a struggle to get over that feeling of never being good enough.

I do have a few relatives who are truly at the genius level. One was taken out of highschool and for a while was a codebreaker at the US government. He is very much a textbook case of absolute brilliance in maths and sciences with very limited social ability.
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 21 Apr 2012 7:28 PM
 15 Jan 2007
candctroll
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I wasn't a genius but I was in the gift and talented program from grade 4 till high school. We met at the high school one day a week after school for an extra class that we got to choose. We also got to go on a lot of neat field trips through the program.

Looking back it was a great experience for me.
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 21 Apr 2012 9:13 PM
 18 Jul 2006
Dazed
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8,516
I recently read "An Abundance of Katherines" by John Green. It's main character was a child genius and I found it really interesting because many times, it just means that they learn fast and efficiently, not that they are likely to actually do something that becomes an amazing contribution to humanity. I highly recommend the book (although that's because it's a good book, not just for the insight into geniuses).
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 21 Apr 2012 9:55 PM
 29 Jan 2010
 Winnipeg
Summernightsky
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I think it's fascinating to hear from those of you who were able to be part of a 'gifted' program at school. I am fairly certain I could have benefitted from a program like that had it exsisted for me. Instead I was also reading at age 3 etc, and went to a multiple grades (3) per class school (very small rural school). So for grades 1+2 I would do my work, and that of the older classes, and then in grade 3 I in essence helped teach the younger classes etc. I was also socially behind my age, and would stay I still tend to struggle with that.
I do think that there are significant challenges growing up being labelled a 'genius'.
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 21 Apr 2012 10:18 PM
 31 Jul 2009
 out in left field
jdfbride
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I hadn't starting talking yet when I was 3 so they had me tested and I'm not sure if there was a score involved, but they said at that time, I had the comprehension of a 7 year old.

I got good grades, but was never in an advance program. My social skills didn't really really exist until my 20's and I joined an organization that was leadership development and it really brought me out of my shell.
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 21 Apr 2012 11:41 PM
 22 May 2006
 Calgary
Fabulosity
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6,183
I was tested as a child, and was in the 'highly gifted' range, which I believe is 135 - 145. The only difference for me was that I was put into 'gifted' classes at school. Regular program, but enhanced with special classes that provided customizable challenges to keep me interested in school. Eg, I was strong in problem solving and math, so most of my additional work was in these areas. Because of the test results, I also would be invited to courses over the summer/spring break that would allow me to take a crash class in something challenging.

I don't think I was disadvantaged or weirded because of the test and score. All it did was open up the right doors to keep me engaged in school. I went through normal teenaged angst...but eventually did ok - full tuition scholarship to uni and am doing ok for myself now.
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 22 Apr 2012 12:30 AM
 8 Apr 2009
 Ontario
Gir
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3,759
That's a crazy news story. I would think being the support system for a child like that would be difficult for the average parent. It's neat that they know so early how advanced he is so they can really be proactive in helping him.

I was in gifted/enriched classes starting in early public school. They thought I was having a hard time in school (late reader specifically) so they tested me thinking I might be slower than the other kids. Ended up I was quite smart, I just had a learning disability (dyslexia). Once they figured out I read/see things differently and I wasn't doing poorly in other areas (just bored) they started me in the gifted/enriched programs. They wanted to move me up a grade but my mom wanted me to stay with my peers.

Like others, I had a difficult transition to post-secondary. I coasted through the end of high-school not having to do homework, not studying and still being an honour roll student. Once I arrived at post-secondary I quickly realized I had no time-management skills and no study skills. I definitely have not lived up to my "potential" (or at least what I was always told was my potential).
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 22 Apr 2012 9:27 AM
 28 Jun 2011
marieal
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1,497
Wow, alot of gifted people on WBells.
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 22 Apr 2012 11:08 AM
 18 Jul 2006
Dazed
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DFTBA forever, LateAugust!!! I've been missing the videos lately. Anything you think is particularly must-not-miss?
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 31 Oct 2012 11:59 PM
 30 Apr 2012
 buzzle.ca
buzzle
New Member
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Want to continue the discussion?

For more discussion like this or to reconnect with weddingbells.ca forum members, check out the forums at buzzle.ca!
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 22 Apr 2012 11:11 AM
 1 Jan 2006
FeministSprig
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I am a bit of a different story. Was identified and invited to our gifted program, and chose not to go (no regrets there).

It matches my philosophy as a teacher, it is sooo important to have classrooms with the spectrum of gifted students to those who struggle.
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 22 Apr 2012 11:28 AM
 30 Sep 2006
LF4e
Devotee
2,482
My nephew has never been identified but he is incredibly smart. I am regularly amazed by him. However, he is very socially immature. At almost 6 years old, he still throws tantrums that you might expect from a 2 year old. It's very annoying.

My mom was a teacher and near the end of her career she worked in the board office. She was asked to go to a grade 5 classroom to assist in determining "what was wrong" with a student in the class. He wasn't doing any of the work, he was disruptive, he was a class clown, etc. My mom spent 1 day watching him and immediately suspected that he was "too smart" for the class. She started working with him individually, giving him harder and harder work every few days -- within a week he was doing university math...quickly....with no problems. Apparently all of the behaviour issues stemmed from him being bored in class, and he wasn't doing his work because he didn't see the point. He ended up staying in the same class, but on very specialized programming.
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 22 Apr 2012 11:41 AM
 14 Feb 2007
 North Delta, BC
SBee
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My brother and I were both assessed as gifted when we were in elementary school. He was urged to skip a grade but my parents declined. On the other hand, I was given carte blanche to leave my classroom at any point during the day and mosey down the hall to a small 'gifted' classroom where we basically just hung out and worked on REALLY cool projects (model rockets for one). The deal was as long as we kept up with our regular classroom work we could go to the other class when bored.

My FIL was never tested but I'm pretty sure he would have classified as a genius. Incredibly smart. The way he could grasp new scientific (or any topic really) concepts in the blink of an eye was always mind-boggling to me. He absolutely showed Aspergers tendencies, major anxiety and depressive tendencies, and was agoraphic at the time of his death. He used to stay awake for 2-3 days at a time, no naps or anything, researching whatever new thing was on his mind. He also liked to invent things and was very much an entrepreneur.

My DH shows similar traits to his dad, but not on the same level. My SIL as well. She can do complicated math in her head in seconds. I'm excellent with math but she blows me away with her speed.

I was always jealous of my friends with average abilities because there seemed to be less pressure put on most of them and they just seemed HAPPIER overall. But as I'm getting older, people I'm close to are revealing more and more how they felt jealous of my smarts all along. I think the grass really is greener.

I hope my son does well in school but I hope I can avoid putting the pressure on him that my parents put on me. I just want him to be happy.
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 22 Apr 2012 12:04 PM
 2 Dec 2007
 Mississauga, On
kalua80
Postaholic
8,326
My hubby is a part Mensa. He wasn't a super baby genius, just a normal baby that seem to catch things slightly a little faster but nothing that stood out like crazy. Once in high school, his mom put him in a gifted school (de la salle in ottawa). Therefore, all the students in this school where there either for in an arts concentration or in the gifted program. He said that was the best for him because for the first time he didn't have to hide his grades or make mistakes on purpose to not get teased by other students.

I do find that hubby has a bit of social skills problems but it's more in the way he speaks to people. Since he knows about so much, people get discourage that they can never teach him anything. And the way he speaks is sometimes a bit more scientific which some people find boring. But put a few drinks in him and he beomes fun. I also find the he lacks some bed side matters sometimes. I am the social one between us, so we compliment each other well. If we need to write an email, he'll write it and I'll add that extra sentence to make the email friendlier.
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 22 Apr 2012 12:32 PM
 2 Aug 2009
Nuke
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3,348
^^^Hmm hot and a genius!

I thought they stopped doing IQ tests in schools years ago. How are people still becoming "geniuses" and members of mensa? Is it just when the parents get it done (as in this case)?
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 22 Apr 2012 1:13 PM
 13 Aug 2006
 Calgary, Alberta
cherryblossom
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6,605
Wow, that's interesting about the University professors and the whole right brain/left brain theory.
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 22 Apr 2012 2:44 PM
 25 Oct 2007
 Alberta
samoreo
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2,991
Moving on.


I wonder what social interaction looks like in schools for gifted children? As in, if there's a "normal?" I once had a prof who taught at a school for kids with below average IQs, and she said it worked really well as no one stood out for being different.
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 22 Apr 2012 3:03 PM
 13 Aug 2006
 Calgary, Alberta
cherryblossom
Postaholic
6,605
^This is really interesting. I've heard of parents who have decided not to put their gifted kids into certain schools with gifted programs because they assume most of the kids will have social issues, and they want their kids to be around a balanced mix of kids. Sounds like that wasn't the case for you Malkynn.
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 22 Apr 2012 3:55 PM
 24 Nov 2010
 Ajax
SarahinDisguise
Rookie
146
As a gifted kid, I did have social issues, but I often wonder if some of that wasn't propagated by the incessant tormenting I endured from the "normal" kids.

I wasn't put in a different school, just one day a week I'd go to a different classroom with other gifted kids and we'd do some extra work, problem-solving and the like. But the torture I endured for it by other kids in my class was awful. I don't remember starting out school as being socially awkward, if anything I remember being a chatterbox and getting in trouble for distracting the other kids. But after being classified gifted everything changed and it was like I was no longer welcomed in my peer group.

I often wonder if being in a school of only gifted kids might have made for an easier time of it. Then again, it may have made things worse. The parental pressure was bad enough as it was, I can't imagine what it would've been like in a special school.
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 22 Apr 2012 10:00 PM
 21 Apr 2007
 Ontario
MyGeek
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2,263
From the article ...

Quote:
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 23 Apr 2012 1:07 AM
 11 Nov 2008
 Ottawa
tweet
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4,254
I went into the gifted program in high school and loved it. We learned at a much quicker pace, often skipped ahead in the material by 2 or 3 years and had a lot of time to just sit and chat in class. Because we were nerds it typically went between the stuff we just learned to the newest video games.

I also managed however to run with the cool crowd. It was such a weird dynamic, to walk down the halls of my school and be friends with almost everybody. I had to do a lot of sticking up for my gifted buddies at times, it helped that I was very confident so nobody bothered to pick on me.

As far as socially? Ya I guess I'm a little socially weird. It takes time to know me but once you do we're all good.

What Malkynn said was pretty correct, there was definitely a lot of pressure put on most kids in my class. Luckily my parents just wanted me to be happy, get good enough grades to get into college/uni and not get arrested. I always called myself the dumb gifted kid, I was typically on the bottom end of the grades but I blame that on my "being cool" that got in the way of learning sometimes.

We didn't get grades of B's though, they didn't bell curve us as they compared our grades to the rest of the classes as well (which looking back wasn't fair as we learned SUCH different and more material than the average did). All of us were regularly over 80%, often ranging between 92-100% on all tests/assignments.

Anyways, I love talking about my gifted days, I really did enjoy it. I wasn't gifted in public school as I would've had to take a special bus to that school and it was on the other side of town, so my parents didn't want to bother with that.

Oh, I will also say that I bombed in University. I 100% blame the fact that we weren't taught how to study since we never had to. Everything came naturally and there was no push to practice, so once I did have to do that I sucked at it. Made it through with my BSc in Math-Physics but didn't make it to my PhD as planned.
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 23 Apr 2012 9:40 AM
 13 Aug 2002
 Toronto
FriendsFirst
Queen of the Forum
28,628
I tested at genius level in grade school... I was tested because I was bored to tears in class and the board was launching a new 'gifted program' that would collect children with exceptionally high IQ at one school one day a week to provide a more challenging, less 'restrictive' curriculum (lots of arts, lots of logic puzzles, research projects, etc.). We were all pretty 'normal' in my grade-level group and related well with our peers outside the program.

Then I went to a private school for a couple of years... entrance exam... all high IQ kids from across the province... all the teachers were associate professors at the local university. A very interesting mix of kids... mostly we related well to each other. Very few, though, had friends who didn't attend that school. I notice that folks from that school developed a pretty off-beat sense of humour, though. Grads generally went to the top schools for post-secondary studies.

My parents were reluctant to let either my brother (who's much smarter than me... but has mental health issues, and was labelled as "hyperactive" in grade school) skip grades or do more than the 1 day a week on a 'special' program... but for both of us, by grade 6 it was obvious that we weren't going to benefit from an education in a 'regular' school because we were bored with the curriculum and consequently weren't trying at all. (according to one of my abnormal psych courses in University, 'giftedness' is considered a learning disability now, at least from a psych perspective)

And, like Tweet... we didn't do so well in University in courses that actually required work, because we had coasted through grade school and high school, so never developed good study skills.

As for now... well, I'm painfully shy, so social interaction is a pain in the butt for me, but I think once I get used to people, I do ok. My brother suffers from a social anxiety disorder.

Testable IQ, though, declines over time and can be impacted by quality of diet and amount of sleep. If 60 pre-schoolers test at a 'genius' level, chances are decent that only about 10 of them will still test at that level by middle-school.... and possibly only 1 or 2 by the time they're 25 years old.

As for how are people testing as genius and getting into Mensa... they run testing events at regular intervals... anyone can sign up and be tested, for a fee. And if they make the current cut-off, they'll be invited to join.


I think, really, that how 'balanced' a 'gifted' child grows up to be will really depend on their parents. If the parents are determined that their child's experiences will be well-rounded and include socialization activities, then the kids will be fairly close to 'normal', socially and academically... if the parents are determined that their exceptional child is destined for greatness and will find the cure for all the diseases in the world and never put them in sports or music classes or let them go to the movies or dances, then they're going to be 'socially stunted'. But the same holds true for more 'average' kids, too, I think.
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 23 Apr 2012 8:02 PM
 10 Apr 2012
Ginger Kitty
New Member
29
I find it very interesting how many people support streaming for those that are deemed 'gifted', but streaming for low cog. students is extremely frowned upon.
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 23 Apr 2012 8:02 PM
 2 Apr 2005
cake
Devotee
2,232
I would say learning disability might be somewhat apt in that for people that easily absorb knowledge, once they've hit their mental wall, many have a tough time actually applying themselves & studying and learning while continuing to excel. Others never hit a wall.

Not sure that's what the OP meant though.
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 23 Apr 2012 8:10 PM
 5 Mar 2012
Applefrog
Chatterbox
360
Wow, how incredible!
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 23 Apr 2012 8:42 PM
 15 Jul 2010
MommyG
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1,692
I'm another who was identified as "gifted" in grade 2 and was in te program through to high school when the got rid of the enriched classes.

I didn't do very well in university also because my study skills were undeveloped and I had so much more freedom and didn't bother doing a lot of the work I should have.
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 23 Apr 2012 9:10 PM
 26 Jun 2009
 Montreal
Malkynn
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4,839
Man, my gifted program in high school was brutal, it was easily more work than university was, and definitely prepared me well for the university workload.

It made me a neurotic performance-junky, but definitely taught me how to study, write efficiently, and think critically, even moreso than a lot of my 1st year classes.
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 24 Apr 2012 12:52 AM
 11 Mar 2009
 the Centre of the Universe
siorhona
Postaholic
7,643
I'm another one that never learnt how to study, or follow through with homework etc.

Like PP's FIL, I'll stay up all night researching whatever fascinates me at the time...I'd much rather do what interests me than what is required of me...and I got away with it all through school, and even part of university.

I have serious social awkwardness. Part of it is that I just can't relate to most people and get frustrated with them easily. Even something as simple as going to a fast food joint. I can look at the menu board and process it instantly and decide what I want in about 2 seconds...and then have to wait 5 minutes while whoever I'm with goes through it item by item. Or explaining what to me are simple, easy to understand concepts, but other people just. don't. get it.

I probably do have Aspergers...I was never tested, but do have a lot fo the signs (another late night hmmmm I wonder interwebz search...) High IQs are also linked to depression and other mental disorders, like OCD (check, and check).

I'm much better now than I was as a kid...I can actually talk to people now without wanting to scream. It was very isolating being in the brainer class. Really did damage to my self esteem.

If DD has an IQ anywhere near mine, she's staying the hell out of the gifted class. We'll build nuclear reactors and scale models describing the motions of quarks on the weekends.
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 24 Apr 2012 11:59 AM
 13 Aug 2002
 Toronto
FriendsFirst
Queen of the Forum
28,628
Regarding giftedness as a 'learning disability'... all I said was that according to one of my psych classes it was considered one. Not that it's necessarily recognized as one equivalent to, say, dyslexia, dysgraphia, language processing disabilities, etc. And it was one course!

I do think, though, that it does present learning challenges as much as some other more widely recognized disabilities because gifted kids don't learn the same way as 'regular' kids... just like kids with other learning challenges don't learn the same way. *shrug*

As for streaming... While I'm not a fan of segregation based on IQ, I do think that there's a place for a certain amount of class segregation based on learning styles/abilities... tailoring class sizes & teaching methods to benefit all the kids in the class, rather than having everyone in one group with the kids on either end of the 'scale' suffering either from boredom or a lack of individual instruction time to help them make the connections needed to learn whatever subject. But then, my highschool had 4 streams *shrug*
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 24 Apr 2012 1:51 PM
 22 Sep 2004
 In the Land of Misfit Toys
evil.mena
Raving Lunatic
14,430
FF, I read a site a while back on ADHD and they termed it 'learning different' which I find is much more suitable than disability. Disability infers 'can't' whereas a lot of these are really smart, they just learn in a different way than most.
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 24 Apr 2012 2:04 PM
 13 Aug 2002
 Toronto
FriendsFirst
Queen of the Forum
28,628
That makes a lot of sense, 'mena. I think most kids with learning challenges don't necessarily need a 'diagnosis' so much as they need someone to figure out which key will open up their potential.

Of course... that would require more funding for the right educational professionals which sadly seems unlikely.

Isn't that supposed to be one of the benefits of Montessori programs? That the kids get to figure out their own learning styles? (for obvious reasons, I'm not terribly well informed on Montessori... I haven't had the need to know it)
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 24 Apr 2012 6:23 PM
 22 Sep 2004
 In the Land of Misfit Toys
evil.mena
Raving Lunatic
14,430
Yes, Montessori is supposed to follow the child. Oddly enough, my kid lacks focus so it may be that the structure of regular school may work for him...we're going to see if it works. Allowing him to guide his own path means he can get lost easily...does that make sense? At least in the Casa classes, there's a lot of children so they don't get the one on one you might think...as the grades elevate the class numbers are smaller (in his school) like WAY smaller so that may be an option.
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 24 Apr 2012 8:10 PM
 1 Jan 2006
FeministSprig
Postaholic
6,928
We will often talk about learning difficulties, and learning disabilities as a divide.

Learning styles is a whole new thread lol.
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 25 Apr 2012 1:17 PM
 13 Aug 2002
 Toronto
FriendsFirst
Queen of the Forum
28,628
I'm not sure membership in Mensa would really have any benefit for a 2-year-old... but as he gets older, he'd have an established network to tap into to help him deal with the potential for frustration with schooling and social relationships with his age-peers. It's not a society of ultra-academics, either... high IQ, yes, but it's folks from all walks of life... scientists, professors, yes... but also actors, housewives, janitors... doctors and drop-outs... artists... mechanics... many of whom have had to address the challenges that go with a very high IQ that aren't necessarily challenges faced by the other 98% of the world. Plus it will provide mental stimulation that might help him stay focused. So, social and intellectual stimulation beyond regular school curicula.
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 26 Apr 2012 1:10 PM
 23 Jun 2007
 Tinseltown
Poulette
Postaholic
9,801
I was fully literate before kindergarten - in both official languages. I was always grades ahead of my peers in terms of language skills. When the school requested that I skip grades, my mom (who happens to be a teacher) refused because while I rocked language, my math skills might not be on par AND the fact that because my birthday was at the end of the year, she was very worried about the maturity gap.

It was still awkward. I remember being in grade 2 having to sneak up to the grade 6 classroom to pick up "des fiches de lecture" (reading files? Designed to test grammar and reading comprehension) while my classmates were just learning to string syllables together.

I was still bored to tears all the way up to University, and like many of the PPs, never really learned how to discipline myself to study and put in the work required of me.
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 31 Oct 2012 11:59 PM
 30 Apr 2012
 buzzle.ca
buzzle
New Member
0

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